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SAVINAR SUPER STORE

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  • FIRSTAID KIT (GAUZE, TAPE,BANDAGES)
  • CHILDRENS STRENGTH PAIN RELIVER
  • THERMOMETER
  • THROAT LOZENGES
  • DIARRHEA/LAXATIVES
  • HYDROCORTISONE CREAM
  • CLOTHES LINE/DETERGENT
  • SEWING KIT
  • STAIN REMOVER
  • SUNSCREEN
  • TWEEZERS
  • INSECT REPELLENT
  • HAND SANITIZER
  • SINK STOPPER
  • KNIFE (LEATHERMAN)
  • INFLATABLE HANGERS
  • LARGE ENVELOPES
  • PLASTIC ZIP-LOCK BAGS
  • FLASHLIGHT
  • WHISTLE
  • DOOR LOCK
  • LAUNDRY BAG
  • COMPASS

Here are some suggestions you should consider packing in your carry-on, for your next vacation:

Guide Book

Empty water bottle

Travel Journal W/Pen

Travel Pillow

Travel Blanket

Eye Mask

Ear Plugs

Playing Cards

Travel Games (Chess, Backgammon)

Books on Tape

Travel Socks

External Battery for Phone, iPad

Coloring Book/Crayons

No-Jet-Lag Pills

Flip Flops/Slippers

   

DOMESTIC TRAVEL

  • MAKE ARRANGEMENTS FOR PAYMENT OF BILLS THAT WILL COME DUE DURING YOUR ABSENCE ( PAY EARLY IF POSSIBLE)
  • CANCEL NEWSPAPER DELIVERY
  • ARRANGE FOR LAWN – PLANT WATERING/LAWN MOWING
  • CONTACT POST OFFICE FOR A TEMPORARY HOLD OF ALL MAIL
  • ARRANGE FOR PET CARE FOR ALL ANIMALS
  • INFORM YOUR NEIGHBOR/ POLICE – ALARM COMPANY OF ABSENCE, AND HOW TO MAKE CONTACT IN

AN EMERGENCY

  • ASK YOUR NEIGHBOR TO REMOVE DOORKNOB HANGERS AND FLYERS
  • PURCHASE TRAVEL ACCIDENT – MEDICAL INSURANCE, TRIP INSURANCE
  • SELECT AIRLINE SEATS EARLY
  • PRE-ORDER MEALS TO MEET YOUR SPECIAL DIETARY REQUIREMENTS
  • GIVE YOUR TRAVEL ITINERARY TO A NEIGHBOR OR FRIEND
  • MAKE A PHOTOCOPY OF THE FRONT AND BACK OF THE CREDIT CARDS YOU ARE TAKING, AIRLINE TICKETS, PASSPORT, AND RESERVATION CONFORMATIONS. (MAKE A COUPLE OF COPIES AND KEEP THEM APART, SO   THEY WILL BE EASY TO FIND IF THE ORIGINALS ARE LOST).
  • LEAVE A SET OF HOUSE AND CAR KEYS WITH A RELATIVE OR FRIEND.
  • PLACE LUGGAGE TAGS BOTH OUTSIDE AND INSIDE YOUR LUGGAGE
  • PLACE BRIGHT COLORED OR LABELED STRAPS, TAGS, ON LUGGAGE TO MAKE IT EASY TO FIND.

 INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL

  • OBTAIN OR RENEW PASSPORT AND INTERNATIONAL DRIVERS PERMIT
  • SECURE VISAS OR TOURIST CARDS  (ALL NECESSARY DOCUMENTS FOR TRAVEL)
  • CHECK ON TOURIST REGULATIONS FOR COUNTRIES TO BE VISITED
  • ORDER A COPY OF THE FREE BOOKLET (KNOW BEFORE YOU GO)   U.S. CUSTOMS SERVICE. BOX 7407 WASHINGTON D.C. 20044

JUST BEFORE LEAVING

  • BE SURE TO CHECK TO SEE IF YOUR AIRLINE FLIGHT OR TRAIN,BUS,CRUISE SHIP IS ON TIME
  • TURN ON ANSWERING MACHINE
  • LOWER BOTH REFRIGERATOR AND WATER HEATER THERMOSTATS
  • TURN OFF LIGHTS/HEAT/AIR CONDITIONER/WINDOW FANS
  • SECURE WINDOWS AND DOORS ALL AROUND YOUR HOME OR APARTMENT
  • TURN OFF WATER SUPPLY
  • SET YOUR HOME LIGHT TIMERS TO GO ON AND OFF AT RANDOM TIMES , BOTH EARLY AND LATE

GENES LUGGAGE

818-364-8787

genesluggage.com

 

                     

WHAT TO PACK

  • Cell phone: If your child does not have a cell phone yet, get him or her a pay-as-you-go phone – make it easy for them to contact you in an emergency. Pay-as-you-go phones can be purchased from most cell phone retailers for as little as $30. Make sure your child knows how to place a collect call and provide a calling card that can be used at a public telephone.
  • Gift cards: Purchase a couple of pre-paid gift cards worth $25 or $50, this will let your child purchase food or any unexpected charges during the trip. This will save you the worry of them traveling with a large amounts of cash.
  • Family members contact information: Give your child a list of names, numbers and addresses of the people who are going to be picking your child up at the airport.
  • Photographs: Include a picture of the person who will be meeting them at the airport, and write the name and contact information on the back.
  • Medication: Make sure your child has all medications he or she needs and is comfortable taking medications on their own.
  • Travel day’s schedule: Make sure your child knows what to do in an emergency. Always explain to them how to handle flight delays, cancellations or how to handle an overnight stay. Provide at least two copies of this information and store it in two different places.
  • Snacks: Pack some of their favorite foods such as chips, cookies, sandwiches, nuts, grapes, berries, gum, etc. Also tell them to buy a bottle of juice or water after they pass through the security checkpoint. Helps with jet lag.
  • Entertainment: Put together a travel pouch to keep them entertained during the flight. Include such items as coloring books, crayons, books or handheld video games – wonderful distractions for little ones.

 

 

                                                      BEFORE THE FLIGHT

 

  • Contact your airline carrier in advance of making a reservation for specific information and guidelines regarding children traveling alone.
  • Always book a morning flight. If it is delayed or canceled, you have the rest of the day to make alternate plans.
  • Any child under 17, flying alone on an international flight, must have a signed note from a parent or responsible adult giving permission, destination and length of stay.
  • You must provide information regarding who will be dropping off and picking up your child from each airport. Children are escorted off the aircraft by a flight attendant and released to the designee or another designated employee.
  • Go over with your child his or her itinerary and use a neck pouch for all their travel documents – especially if they’ll be needed for a return flight.
  • Do not let your child wear any clothing that has his/her name on it, try not to make it easier for an impersonator to convince a child that they can be trusted.
  • Mark your child’s luggage with a colorful ribbon, that makes it easy for them to recognize their bag.

 

 

 AT THE AIRPORT

  • Arriving early is important. Unaccompanied minors are usually allowed to board the plane early, so airlines recommend allowing plenty of time to check in and get through security. A relaxed pace will also be less stressful for your child.
  • Inform the flight attendants that your child is traveling alone. Confirm that he or she will be seated in an area of the aircraft that’s convenient for attendants to keep an eye out – the very front or very back of the aircraft is ideal.
  • When a connecting to another flight, pay any extra fees that are necessary to have a flight attendant assist your child to that connecting flight. Siblings flying together usually pay only one escort fee.

 

Genes Luggage

818-364-8787

 

Have you ever found yourself standing with your carry-on, in a security line that goes on forever with delays during the peak travel times that can sometimes exceed the length of a flight? Well, when flying you do not have to — if you are willing to pay a little. But, before you refuse to fork over your extra cash, consider the options. For lots of frequent travelers, it can be well worth the upfront cost to eliminate delays and your sanity later.

There are many programs that work to get you through airport screening faster, but TSA Pre-check is my favorite. TSA agents will direct you to the front of the line, or, more accurately, through a separate TSA Pre-check express lane.

   TSA Pre-check is a new screening program that helps many business travelers get through TSA security screenings faster. Some 97% of TSA Pre- check passengers were delayed less than five minutes in line in July 2016, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

The cost for travelers is $85 for a five-year membership. After filling out a brief online application, you will attend a 10-minute, in-person background check and finger printing appointment at one of the 380 enrollment centers in the United States. You can apply anytime and you will get the approval in about 30 to 45 days from the time your application is completed.

Your benefits include:

  • Faster screening process full-time or during busy times at 180 participating airports , for “low risk” customers flying on one of 16 participating airlines. (NOTE: Due to the nature of airport security, faster screening is not always guaranteed.)
  • Kids ages 12 and under flying with a parent or guardian with a TSA Pre-check stamp on their boarding pass will be able to participate in expedited screening.
  • You will not need to remove shoes, laptops, 3-1-1 liquids, belts or light jackets.

 

Genes Luggage

818-364-8787

 

 

 

We all try to make the most of our limited time overseas, yet fail to take into account the leap in time zones we make in a matter of hours. It can take your body’s internal clock several days to catch up to that leap, and in the meantime you’re likely to experience the disruption of your sleeping and waking cycle known as jet lag. Symptoms of jet lag include feeling sleepy during the day, insomnia at night, poor concentration, confusion, hunger at inappropriate times or lack of appetite, and general irritability. Take a look at our list of best practices to combat jet lag

  1. Adjust your internal clock.
    A week before your departure, gradually shift your sleeping and eating times to coincide with those at your destination. Once you arrive, adopt the local time for your daily routine.
  2. Try overnight flights.
    This allows you to have dinner at a normal time and be much more likely to sleep than on an afternoon flight. Depending on the length of the flight and the number of time zones you cross, you’ll arrive at your destination in the morning or afternoon. This is the best way to replicate your normal schedule, and it’ll be easier for you to reset your internal clock.
  3. No coffee.
    Avoid overeating and caffeine 12 hours before, as well as during, your flight. Caffeine helps keep you awake longer, but also makes you wake up more often when you do fall asleep and reduces total sleep time.
  4. Stay hydrated.
    Try to drink at least 8 ounces of water for every hour you’re in the air—even when you don’t feel thirsty. If you wear contact lenses, clean them thoroughly before your flight, use eye drops in the air, and consider removing your lenses when you nap. Remember to pack a bottle of moisturizing lotion, lip balm, and a hydrating spray with essential oils (not just water) in your carry-on bag. Just be sure all liquid toiletries are in a TSA compliant travel bottles (3.5oz).
  5. No alcohol in-flight.
    Cabin air dehydrates passengers, and altitude changes can increase the effects of alcohol (the rule of thumb is one drink in the air = two or three on the ground). An alcohol drink may relax you, but it will also dry you out, and your jet lag symptoms will be worse.
  6. Sleep on the plane is important.
    Sleep is especially important when traveling overnight or flying west to east. Travel can be extremely tiring, so the more rest you get en route the more prepared you’ll be to deal with the stresses of jet lag. For example, on a long flight – United States to Asia – try saving up enough dollars or frequent-flier miles to fly business or first class, as it’s a lot easier to sleep when your seat reclines all the way back. If you can’t avoid coach, opt for a window seat and bring enough padding (neck pillows and travel blanket ) to prop yourself up against the wall.
  7. Use sleeping pills wisely.
    A pill with a short cycle may be helpful on overnight flights. Make sure, however, that you time the dosage correctly or you may be very groggy when you land. Also, an airplane is not the place to try out a pill for the first time, so only take medications you are already familiar with.
  8. See if melatonin is for you.
    Consider taking the nonprescription drug melatonin. Research suggests that the body uses this hormone to set its time clock. Because melatonin seems to control when we go to sleep and when we wake up, a number of scientists advocate supplements to alleviate jet lag. Some (but not all) studies suggest that taking 3 milligrams of fast-release melatonin prior to bedtime for several days after arrival in a new time zone can ease the transition.
  9. Get outside.
    After arrival, spend a lot of time out in the sunlight, which will help your body reset its natural time clock to coincide with your new surroundings.
  10. Don’t drift off too early.
    Unless you arrive at your destination at night, and reasonably close to a normal bedtime, don’t go to sleep as soon as you reach your hotel. Unless you’re used to taking regular short naps at home, you’re better off staying up until bedtime: If you’re really exhausted from travel, a 20-minute nap could easily become a three-hour nap, which will disrupt your sleep schedule even more—you might find yourself wide awake at 4 AM.

                       

You are all excited to be going on a safari. This will be a trip of a lifetime. What you pack is very important. Probably just as important is what you should NOT take.

  • Books are fun to read, but difficult to travel with. They take up space and can be heavy. Use a kindle or tablet instead.
  • Taking your pair of binoculars is not necessary. Most tours include high powered binoculars for each person.
  • Packing bright colored clothes may seem a good idea. But bright colors might scare away the wildlife. Remember THAT is the reason you are there.
  • Dark colored and white clothing is a big NO! They can attract biting tsetse flies.
  • Taking blue jeans also is not recommended. Too heavy and dark and take up a great deal of space.
  • Travel clothing is a great way to limit how much you need to take, many have insect repellent infused in the fabric.
  • DEET does not help, so I do not recommend taking any . DEET can dissolve plastic on cameras and binoculars.
  • Do not take Benadryl when traveling to Zambia, take Sudafed instead.
  • Taking a heavy coat is never a good idea. Too bulky and heavy. Best to wear layers to stay warm. (T-shirt, shirt, thin jacket)
  • Leave the baseball hat at home. Take a travel hat that covers your neck and ears and is crushable.

 

It is really important to travel lightly and minimize your travel accessories.

Travel clothing can help reduce the amount of items you take.

Try to limit the colors of your garments to: Beige, Khaki, Green and Lt Brown. It is important to blend in.

CLOTHES 

  • 2 – T-shirts (quick drying, antimicrobial fabric can rinse clean.)
  • 2 –  Long sleeved shirts  (travel shirts can block sun and bugs)
  • 1 – Travel vest  (lots of pockets and can be an extra layer)
  • 2 – Zip off pants  (pants and shorts in one)
  • 1 – Safari hat  (Wide brim and crushable)
  • 3 – pair of socks  (quick drying and insect repellent)
  • 3 – pair of underwear  (quick drying and antimicrobial)
  • 1 – bathing suit
  • 1 – lightweight down jacket or windbreaker
  • Lightweight gloves & wool hat
  • Pajamas
  • Flip flops/sandals (wear in the shower)
  • Comfortable hiking boots or walking shoes

ACCESSORIES

  • Kindle or iPad (Great way to carry books and guide books)
  • Headlamp (Helpful for walking between tents at night)
  • Waterproof plastic bag (Keep damp clothes separate)
  • 2 Pairs of reading glasses (Extra just in case)
  • 2 pair of sunglasses (Hard to get a spare pair during the trip)
  • Cell phone (Use at the airport)
  • Chargers for your phone/kindle (Remember to bring the correct plugs to access the wall socket)
  • Lightweight duffel bag for gifts
  • Goggles (Dust can be an issue)
  • Small note pad with retractable pen  (Nice way to keep a log on what happened during the day)
  • Journal (Write down your daily stories during down time)
  • Metal water bottle (Refillable and crush proof)
  • Camera (Take a telephoto lens, extra memory cards and batteries)
  • Small flashlight (As bright as possible)